samsung galaxy s5 review , the samsung galaxy , samsung galaxy s5 phone , samsung galaxy s5 , samsung galaxy s 5 release , samsung galaxy s 5 release date , new samsung galaxy s 5 ,

Top World Economies Dropping the Dollar

World News – Do you ever wonder why the wealthy US citizens like Warren Buffet are selling off their stock in the market? Do you ever wonder why world banks are dropping their US dollars? Do you ever think that perhaps the USA could actually fail? Guess what? It is failing and other world economies are taking notice and dropping the dollar like a bad habit. With a national debt of close to $17 trillion dollars and actual total debt of more near $60 trillion, where is the value in the US currency?

dropping dollarThe U.S Dollar is quickly losing its status as the world reserve currency. Five of the top ten economies in the world, plus a few others, no longer use the dollar as an intermediary currency for trade. This trend poses a huge risk to the dollar and the United States along with it.

ZeroHedge points out today that Australia, the world’s 12th-ranked economy, has now joined a growing list of nations that have agreed to bypass the dollar in bilateral trade with China. China, ranked 2nd behind the U.S., also has similar agreements with Japan (3rd), Brazil (6th), India (9th), and Russia (10th).

Although unilateral agreements have been in place for some time between China and the countries listed above, last week the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) agreed to set up a development bank to compete with the IMF, indicating it’s gearing up to compete in a post-dollar world.

Additionally, Brazil, who agreed in principle to drop the dollar with bilateral trade with China some time ago, just made it official with $30 billion in annual currency swaps which will facilitate around 50% of all trade between them.

Besides those agreements with China, some of these nations have made other similar agreements with each other. India and Japan began swapping $15 billion in each other’s currency in 2011 to handle their bilateral trade. And the sanctions against Iran haven’t stopped them from trading oil with China, Russia, and India in anything but the dollar.

Here’s how the current reign of the US dollar compares to previous world reserve currency:

Reserve Currency Status

It appears that the dollar is certainly nearing the end of its reign, which could lead to severe economic hardship for the United States.

Dave Hodges writes:

The United States’ good economic fortune is due solely to the fact that world must use the dollar, the Petrodollar if you will, in order to make their nation’s individual oil purchases; this provides the only source of backing for the U.S. dollar that the Federal Reserve requires in order to somewhat sustain our back-breaking debt that the banker-occupied United States government has passed along to the American taxpayer in the form of bailouts.

And Marin Katusa of Casey Research writes:

If the US dollar loses its position as the global reserve currency, the consequences for America are dire. A major portion of the dollar’s valuation stems from its lock on the oil industry – if that monopoly fades, so too will the value of the dollar. Such a major transition in global fiat currency relationships will bode well for some currencies and not so well for others, and the outcomes will be challenging to predict. But there is one outcome that we foresee with certainty: Gold will rise. Uncertainty around paper money always bodes well for gold, and these are uncertain days indeed.

America’s imperialism, combined with its ultra-fiat status of unending debt creation, appears to have created a final downward spiral that has caused many of the top economies to abandon a sinking ship. It might not be too much longer before the rest follow suit. Now might be a great time to consider diversifying into other currencies, and even digital currencies, to mitigate growing losses in the U.S. dollar.

From The Activist Post

Related posts

Top
Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Google Plus